Collecting every piece of gear takes a little time.
We think it's worth the wait.

Nice choice!
Give us a moment to collect those options for you.

Grivel Master Pro Belay Device
  • Grivel Master Pro Belay Device
  • Grivel Master Pro Belay Device

Master Pro

Rating

My vote: None ( 4.6 avg )

Description

A single device for belaying the leader, one or two seconding climbers and for rappelling.

Extra friction ‘V’ slots add more control and smoothness during maneuvers.

When belaying seconds, can be used as an autoblocking belay

Can also be used as an ascender

Cooling Technolgy inner holes allow more airflow therefore less heat build and a lighter object. It also gives easier access to remove snow/ice and mud.

Retail price

US$ 32.99
Device Type

Device Type

Tube

The most commonly used belay type also called an “ATC” or “tuber.” Other than a distinction between other belay device types, “Tube” is a rarely used term, most climbers just assume you're talking about this style when they refer to your "belay device."

Tube belay device example

Figure 8

Mostly used in rescue, canyoneering, tactical, work safety, or by old school climbers and rappellers. One reason they went out of popularity with recreational climbers is because they tend to create twists in the rope.

Figure 8 belay device example

Brake Assist

These devices assist in stopping the rope when a climber falls or hangs on the rope.

Brake Assist belay device example

Often referred to as “auto-blocking” but that’s not the official terminology because no belay device should be assumed to work automatically by itself, even if it feels like it does (or does most the time).

Plate

When simplicity is a must, or you started climbing before Tubers were the norm. Bonus: They tend to be very light weight.

Plate belay device example

Descender

For rappelling, not for belaying a lead climber or top-roping.

Descender example
Tube
Weight (g)

Weight (g)

In grams, the weight, as stated by the manufacturer/brand.

88 g
Belay Brake Assist

Belay Brake Assist

This is when the belay device significantly reduces the amount of holding power the belayer must exert to stop a fall and hold a climber.

This is also called "assisted-braking" as the device must hold a significant amount of the climber’s weight; this term does not include friction-adding "teeth" found on some tube style belay devices.

Confusingly referred to as “auto-blocking” or “auto-locking” these terms wrongly imply the device will always, automatically, stop a fall or hold a climber even if the belayer/rappeller is hands-free. These devices are not meant to be used without a hand on the braking side of the rope; the belayers/rapppeller brake hand should always be on the brake rope.

Worth Considering

Most of the mechanical brake assist devices only hold a single strand of rope and are not capable of double-strand rappelling (the most common method of rappel).

No
Rope Options 1 or 2 ropes
Guide Mode

Guide Mode

This is when you belay directly off the anchor instead of your harness. Guide mode is helpful if you climb outdoors a lot because it reduces the holding power required from the belayer. When your partner falls or rests, the weight of the climber is held mostly by the anchor and the belay device.

Tubers and Plates

When belaying in "guide mode," the tubers and plates turn auto-blocking. During a fall, the climbing rope pinches the slack rope, completely stopping the movement of either rope. A common guide mode setup shown below.

A double rope tubular device guide mode example

Mechanical Brake Assist Devices

There is no difference in the functionality of the device. A brake-hand should always be on the rope to ensure the climber is caught in the case of a fall. A common guide mode setup shown below.

A single rope mechanical brake assist guide mode example

Where guide mode is used

  • multi-pitch sport or trad climbs
  • single-pitch where you need to bring up a follower (say for a walk-off)

Learn More

http://www.climbing.com/skill/essential-skills-auto-blocking-belay-devices/

Up to 2 followers
Teeth

Teeth

Teeth are only seen on tube devices. They add friction that helps grip the rope for more belaying control.

This is helpful for belaying heavier climbers. Teeth are becoming standard on new tube devices.

The belay device teeth are shown in the red circle

Worth Considering

Teeth do wear out. You can limit wear by rappelling on the side without teeth (if you don’t need the extra friction). Once they’re worn, you’ll still have a usable belay device, just less friction.

Yes
Rope Range (mm)

Rope Range (mm)

The range of rope diameters, in millimeters, that the manufacturer/brand specifies can safely be used.

This is the best case scenario and does not necessarily take into consideration that certified ropes have a tolerance of +/- .3 mm.

Recently, manufacturers have started to add an "optimized" rope range -- this is the range that will result in the nicest handling of the belay device.

7.3 mm  - 11.0 mm ­­­
Certification

Certifications

The main climbing gear certifications are CE and UIAA--and normally the UIAA creates the rules that the CE body also supports. When possible, we try to list all the certifications the product carries.

To sell a climbing product in Europe, the device must be CE certified. There are no official requirements to sell climbing gear in the US. The UIAA certification is a voluntary process.

Learn More

Rock and Ice Certifications Guide
EN, UIAA
AVG RATING
5.04
( 5 avg )
Rating
5.04
( 5 avg )

Tuber with 'antlers'

Pros
smooth belay
heat sink holes
extra friction with antlers
Cons
lowering a second
guide mode with larger ropes
Familiarity
I’ve used it a ton

The master pro acts just like any other tuber style belay device ....with extra features. Its special features are the two protruding 'antlers' at the front and added holes in the side.

As specified by Grivel, the rope, or ropes could be quickly twisted behind the antlers, forcing the rope firmly into the friction grooves and adding friction to the Master pro. The extra fiction provided by the antlers is enough to completely block the rope after a fall. Never let go of the rope though! With a quick twist, the rope is twisted back and the Master pro works as any regular tubing belay device. The usage of the antlers is a welcoming feature when the climber is projecting or just 'resting' a lot.

Besides belaying from the body, the antlers don't have any special uses. According to Grivel, the antlers could be used for extra friction during abseiling or make the Master pro usable as an ascender. In practice, the Master pro adds enough friction as a tuber when abseiling. I have tried using the antlers, but the antlers add so much friction that I was basically by the Master pro only. Perhaps when carrying a heavy load or being a very tall and muscular climber is required for sufficiant usage of the antlers when abseiling?

Although the antlers have a good use by quiclky blocking the rope, I recon the antlers hook just a bit too shallow for the rope to stay into the antler's grip. With a bit of movement, the rope naturally comes out of the locked position and the added benefit ceases.

Using the Master pro for belaying one or two seconds in guide mode, I find the antlers awkward for lowering the second climber. According to Grivel, a sling or cordelette would web around the antlers and by moving it through the stance, one could 'unlock'the Master pro. In my opinion, the small 'biner hole' in the front of other tubers (such as the ATC guide or the Reverso) works way easier and smoother for lowering a second climber. Besides having difficulties lowering second climbers, I make sure to use a smal, diameter rope or a new rope as the Master pro is a true master for adding friction. Using older or thicker ropes, I rather belay with a munter hitch than using the Master pro in guide mode. This disadvantage only applies when using the guide mode though. I don't experience any difficulties with older or thicker ropes when belaying rather smooth as a tuber.

The second feature of the Master pro is the holes you will see in the sides of the device. These supposedely acts as a heat sink. Using other tubers, I never felt that heating my device isn't such a major problem, even after rappeling long distances. If youy experience is your rope melting due to excessive heat into your tuber, the Master pro may be just the belay device you need.

In short, The Master pro has quirky features, that benefit single pitch climbing and abseiling for the heavy climbers. Tot much for multi-pitching though.

 

Features of Master Pro Belay Device

No voice but the video shows all the features of Master Pro Belay Device, it's well worth watching.

How to Choose your First Belay Device