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Tendon 9.7 MM Master
  • Tendon 9.7 MM Master
  • Tendon 9.7 MM Master

9.7mm Master 60m Dry

Tendon

Rating

no ratings

Description

A top-class single rope with low weight and our SBS sheath construction that combines both increased resistance to abrasion, and great handling qualities. If you care about maximum performance, you have just found the right rope.

Retail price

US$ 239.95
Weight 61.0 g/m
8.068 lbs / 3660 g
Diameter (millimeters) 9.7 mm
Length (meters) 60 m
Rope Type Single­
UIAA Falls (Single / Half / Twin) ­9  / 00
Dynamic Elongation (Single / Half / Twin) 36.0 % / 0.0 % / 0.0 %
Static Elongation (Single / Half / Twin) 6.3 % / 0.0 % / 0.0 %
Impact Force (Single / Half / Twin) 7.00 kN / 0.00 kN / 0.00 kN
Dry Treatment Sheath­
Sheath Proportion (%) ­
Sheath Slippage (mm) 0 mm
Rope End Marker None
Certification CE
None
Making a Backpack Coil

No reviews yet.

Climbing Report Gear Review no rating given just a review

Everyone that climbed with this rope commented on two things. First, the bright Yellow/Black color combo, which spurred the nickname “Bee Rope.” And the supple clipping and handling of the rope. It has a great feel, not too stiff, not too floppy or kinky. It comes from the factory with a mid-mark, so until you cut an end, you’ll know where the middle is. The 9.7mm size keeps the weight low, which is nice when approaches are long, or you’re working a tall project and you want to limit rope weight.
After all the climbing and abuse that the Tendon Master 9.7 has seen the sheath has one or two nicks and that’s about it. Durability seems to be pretty high, which makes confidence in your lifeline and your ability to push the limits of your climbing even easier. The ropes from Tendon that we’ve tested are among our favorites.

The UIAA equipment standard provides a baseline for equipment performance in a test lab under controlled conditions on new equipment. Although these test conditions are relevant to the conditions encountered climbing, conditions encountered at the crags and the condition of the equipment are equally important. This recommendation from the UIAA member federation The British Mountaineering Council (BMC) provides vital equipment information that is NOT explicitly addressed in the standard, particularly failure modes of the equipment and recommendations for the use, inspection, maintenance, and retirement of equipment.