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Misty Mountain Intrepid

Intrepid

Misty Mountain

Rating

no ratings

Description

Redesigned with improved shape for better fit, the Intrepid has edge tape laminate construction and convenient quick adjust coated T-6 Aluminum buckles. Outer fabric is durable 300 x 400 denier diamond reinforced nylon. Features include four 7” reinforced polyethylene tubular gear loops, rear webbing haul loop, quick release adjustable rear leg loop holdup and reinforced tie-in points. Everything you need and nothing you don’t, the Intrepid is an essential tool for modern vertical adventurers.

Retail price

US$ 94.95

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Weight (g)

Weight

In grams, the weight, as stated by the manufacturer/brand.

If there are differences in weight (due to multiple sizes or optional accessories) we'll list them here.

The default weight is the middle-most size, often this is size M.

433 g

M : 433 g / 15.3 oz

Misty Mountain doesn't provide the weights for other sizes so we're working on gathering this info by hand, stay tuned!

Gender Unisex
Sizes XS, S, M, L, XL
Gear Loops

Number of Gear Loops

Gear loops are used to hold gear (quickdraws, cams, etc) onto your harness. 4 gear loops is most common.

0 - 1 Gear Loops

Most often on full body harnesses or guide/gym style harnesses.

2-3 Gear Loops

Mostly found on lighter harnesses made for [ski] mountaineering or high-end sport climbing where weight is a high priority.

4 - 5 Gear Loops

The standard/most common number for climbing harnesses. Perfect for sport and trad.

More Than 6 Gear Loops

Designed for long multi-pitch and big wall climbing, found on harnesses made to hold the maximum amount of gear.

Worth Considering

Occasionally, the number of gear loops will change on a harness model depending on the size. There could be 7 gear loops for the med/large but only 5 gear loops for the xsmall/small. In this case we list the highest number for the filters, and then write an explanation on the product page like, “Size S/XS can only fit 5 gear loops.”

4 Gear loops
Ice Clip Slots

Ice Clip Slot

Ice clipper slots are made to fit a carabiner that holds ice screws. These slots are generally only used by ice climbers but there is no disadvantage to having them on your harness.

Less than 40% of harnesses will have ice clipper slots. And those harnesses will usually have 2 or 4 slots, often located next to, or between, the gear loops.

No, 0
Belay / Tie-In One Loop
Waist Buckle Type Quick Adjust
Leg Buckle Type Quick Adjust
Drop Seat Yes
Haul Loop

Haul Loop

Trad climbers often look for a haul loop as they're intended to haul a rope (second line) or pack (while you climb the chimney).

A haul loop can also hold shoes or other accessories. Although not the intended use, it is also commonly used to hold a chalk bag.

Yes ­
Certification ­
Size Chart

XS
Waist : 61-66 cm / 24-26 in
Legs : 46-51 cm / 18-20 in

S
Waist : 66-74 cm / 26-29 in
Legs : 48-56 cm / 19-22 in

M
Waist : 74-81 cm / 29-32 in
Legs : 53-61 cm / 21-24 in

L
Waist : 81-89 cm / 32-35 in
Legs : 58-66 cm / 23-26 in

XL
Waist : 89-97 cm / 35-38 in
Legs : 64-71 cm / 25-28 in

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AVG RATING
5.04
( 5 avg )
Rating
5.04
( 5 avg )

Been Saving My Life For 10 Years

Pros
Ridiculously Durable
High Quality, yet Affordable
Generally Comfortable
Made in the USA, by Hand
Can be Customized when Purchased Direct
Cons
None. Read on for situational shortcomings.
Familiarity
I’ve used it a ton

This was my first harness, and it will be ten years old next month, and therefore, I must retire it. I am a guide in Northern California, so I have to be "responsible" or something like that and not ever use it again after replacement.

It started life in a gym in Southwest Indiana, and then saved my life many times while I learned to lead outdoors in Southern Illinois. Then it rested for a few years in college while I took a sorrowful break fromm climbing. Jump to my move out to California in 2015, when my climbing picked back up for my last two years of college. The harness is still kicking, still saving my life in Joshua Tree, Yosemite, and the Tahoe area, and I still love it. Here is why, after ten years, we have a good relationship.

The harness stood up to years of use, and it being retired because of age, not wear.
This harness has been comfortable in pretty much every situation I faced in climbing so far. 
It has enough room to rack for moderate multipitch.
Its made in the USA, 
Mine is old and has double back buckles, which never creep. I love that. 

Here is the only downside I have found with my harness. It is not going to be comfortable on big wall or even any longer multipitch if there are hanging belays. Now, I don't list this as a con because anyone with an understanding of the demands of big wall or hanging belay climbs knows this. Mine also is an older harness model, and edge tape design on harnesses wasn't common yet. So don't count this against the harness. That would be like being upset that your 2003 Camry wasn't a good off-roading vehicle. It just wasn't made with that in mind.

Misty Mountain is a wonderful company. Their harnesses have kept up with technology, and having tried on some of their current models in search of a replacement, I am still very impressed with their products. I highly recomend them. 

I will be replacing this harness with a Cadillac from Misty Mountain, with the old double back buckles. I also will order direct from them. By doing so, they offer to stitch in a second belay loop and an extra gear loop for ten bucks each. As a guide, and for big wall, that will come in handy.

The UIAA equipment standard provides a baseline for equipment performance in a test lab under controlled conditions on new equipment. Although these test conditions are relevant to the conditions encountered climbing, conditions encountered at the crags and the condition of the equipment are equally important. This recommendation from the UIAA member federation The British Mountaineering Council (BMC) provides vital equipment information that is NOT explicitly addressed in the standard, particularly failure modes of the equipment and recommendations for the use, inspection, maintenance, and retirement of equipment.